Forum Posts

Abdullah Alamin
Aug 01, 2022
In Welcome to the Forum
This allows us to match page content with user behavior. Amazon, for example, is excellent in this area. Take a look at what happens when a user navigates from the homepage to a specific product (in this case, a bike): organization of content levels Of note here: The general page for the Cycling category. This is organized as a "hub" page (instead of a product list), allowing the user to browse the various product sub-categories available (bikes, inner tubes, helmets, accessories, shoes, hydration and more). Amazon understands that a user who lands on this page will likely want to filter the search and browse more specific options in order to purchase something. A specific bike sub-category. This page is organized as a list, as it features the same type of products - those fax number list of the same type and similar characteristics, meeting a specific criteria used for the category, where it really makes sense to 'present' them directly to the user. user to buy. By differentiating between site levels like this, we not only reduce the possibility of content in these main categories overlapping (and cannibalizing) subcategories, but will also be likely: improve the exploration of the different levels of sub-categories and main products; and provide a better user experience by organizing content in a way that matches search intent. Another way to differentiate content from similar categories, as well as increase their topical relevance, is to feature specific text descriptions about each.
money away from a liability? Obviously it's  content media
0
0
1

Abdullah Alamin

More actions